The latest video: KO’s Pastitsio

KO’s Pastitsio is a recipe that draws on the cooking know how of three wonderful cooks – my cousin Sofia, my mum and our Greek teacher Kyria Kaiti.
Sofia makes an oh-so-delicious moussaka. The meat sauce she makes for her moussaka has a gorgeous infusion of whole cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves and bay leaves. The meat sauce is cooked for no more than an hour, so the spice flavours are balanced and heavenly and in no way overwhelmed by a heavy, overcooked tomato or meat flavour. This is the meat sauce I have used for KO’s Pastitsio.
My mum’s contribution to the recipe is the structure of the pastitsio – the layers, the quantities and the addition of grated cheese to the bechamél sauce.
Kyria Kaiti tried one of my earlier versions of the pastitsio and recommended an additional layer of béchamel on the base layer of pasta, which I added and it really works to give a lovely smooth and creamy eating feel to the pasta.
My addition to the recipe is the use of casarecce pasta, a ‘tubular’ pasta, without the hollowness of a penne or rigatoni. I feel it adds to the eating experience of this classic and much loved Greek dish!

KO’s Risoni-Rice

KO’s Risoni-Rice is a recipe I learned from my parents-in-law over 30 years ago. My parents-in-law were born and raised as Greeks in Constantinople/Istanbul. Living in a cosmopolitan, multi-cultural city and immersed in the cuisines of many, influenced their kitchen and that of others residing in that great city. This neverending fusion of many co-existing cuisines over aeons has been termed politiki kouzina – food of the πόλη/city – although I prefer to interpret that phrase as ‘cross-cultural cuisine.

The flavour of this rice is elevated by the fried and browned risoni, which imparts a subtle spicy, sweetness to the rice, as well as a lovely texture. It serves well as a beautiful side dish to any of your grilled, stewed or baked main dishes. Make it now and enjoy this slightly sweet twist to your basic rice.

KO’s Risoni-Rice

KO’s Risoni-Rice is a recipe I learned from my parents-in-law over 30 years ago. My parents-in-law were born and raised as Greeks in Constantinople/Istanbul. Living in a cosmopolitan, multi-cultural city and immersed in the cuisines of many, influenced their kitchen and that of others residing in that great city. This neverending fusion of many co-existing cuisines over aeons has been termed politiki kouzina – food of the πόλη/city – although I prefer to interpret that phrase as ‘cross-cultural cuisine.

The flavour of this rice is elevated by the fried and browned risoni, which imparts a subtle spicy, sweetness to the rice, as well as a lovely texture. It serves well as a beautiful side dish to any of your grilled, stewed or baked main dishes. Make it now and enjoy this slightly sweet twist to your basic rice.

Foti’s Lamb Fricassee

Lamb Fricassée is a dish whose aroma and taste returns Foti, our special KO guest, to his childhood years – he is back sitting in the kitchen watching his mother lovingly prepare one of her special recipes for the family and trying his best to absorb the entire experience – the preparation, the cooking and the feasting at the dinner table. And in this way his love for cooking and gathering in celebration of family and friendship is ignited too.

Prepare this hearty, comforting and nourishing dish for you and your loved ones and create your own special memories in the kitchen and around a shared table.

How Kali Orexi began…


A few years ago, I offered some of my mum Antigoni’s ntomatofai (tomato-eat dish) to my friend Sara. Sara enjoyed the ntomatofai so much, she asked if my mum would teach her how to make it. As it was also one of my favourite dishes and I had yet to learn it, I organised a cooking lesson for both of us. When other friends heard about this cooking lesson, they also wanted to join. The numbers grew, so the venue changed from my mum’s kitchen to my kitchen (now the kitchen used in filming Kali Orexi). Read more…